Professor Coates’ bad government proposal for the SEC

Last week, I commented on this blog post by Harvard Professor John Coates, in which he scolds the Securities and Exchange Commission for at least temporarily dropping campaign finance regulation from its agenda. I expressed disappointment that Professor Coates so credulously bought in to the idea that “hundreds of thousands” of “investors” had “written personally” […]

Filed Under: Blog, baa-baas, Dodd-Frank, goo-goos, John Coates, political disclosure, SEC, Securities and Exchange Commission

Did hundreds of thousands of “investors” really write “personally” to the SEC on corporate disclosure? No, not really.

As followers of this blog will know, for the last four years Democrats and others on the political left have been trying to get new mandatory disclosure requirements on spending related to politics. When this effort failed in Congress with the defeat of the so-called DISCLOSE Act, the effort went to the Federal Election Commission. […]

Filed Under: Blog, Communications, Disclosure, Disclosure Press Release/In the News/Blog, Featured Content, Uncategorized, baa-baas, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Common Cause, corporate disclosure, DISCLOSE, Disclose Act, fraudulent claims, goo-goos, John Coates, public citizen, SEC, SEC Rulemaking, Securities and Exchange Commission

Daily Media Links 12/20: Another “clean” candidate caught for corruption, McConnell: IRS has ‘done a lot to lose the trust’ of Americans; he’ll oppose IRS nominee, New Mexico GOP wins campaign finance case, and more…

CCP Another “clean” candidate caught for corruption By Luke Wachob Interestingly, the tax-financing program most frequently touted as a model for states to adopt is also the one that plagued by the most severe corruption problems: New York City’s. The Brennan Center calls New York City’s program a “success,” the Campaign Finance Institute calls it “a model for the nation […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Another “clean” candidate caught for corruption

We often point out that while supporters of tax-financed campaigns portray these programs as a way to fundamentally transform the make-up and behavior of government, existing tax-financing programs are plagued with corruption, and they look (see here and here) and act (see here and here) a lot like the privately-financed legislatures they replaced. Interestingly, the […]

Filed Under: Blog, Tax Financed Campaigns Press Release/In the News/Blog, Tax Financed Campaigns State, Tax-Financing, Maine, New York

In the News: George Washington Law Review: Separation of Campaign and State

By Bradley A. Smith The Court correctly recognizes the deeply troubling nature of the government policies at issue in Davis and Arizona Free Enterprise Club, which involved the government in favoring certain candidates over others, but it has not successfully articulated why those policies are offensive to the First Amendment, given that each law provides more resources for a candidate […]

Filed Under: In the News, Published Articles

Daily Media Links 12/19: Separation of Campaign and State, Would the Far Left [have] Required Disclosure for the NAACP in the 40s and 50s?, Arizona high court upholds higher campaign-contribution limits, and more…

In the News George Washington Law Review: Separation of Campaign and State By Bradley A. Smith The Court correctly recognizes the deeply troubling nature of the government policies at issue in Davis and Arizona Free Enterprise Club, which involved the government in favoring certain candidates over others, but it has not successfully articulated why those policies are offensive to the First […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Daily Media Updates 12/18: Campaign Legal Center agrees with CCP: IRS regulations are not about tax policy, but regulating political speech, New FEC Chairman Chosen to Lead Agency During Election Year, and more…

CCP Campaign Legal Center agrees with CCP: IRS regulations are not about tax policy, but regulating political speech By Brad Smith …Ryan concludes by agreeing with the core point of my editorial. “What’s really at stake here,” he writes, “is disclosure of money spent by tax-exempt groups on candidate-related election activity.” Which was exactly my point. […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links, Uncategorized

In the News: Human Events: Silencing Conservatives – the Administration’s latest attempt to censor political speech

By Hans von Spakovsky But the new proposed regulation would make things even worse.  It suffers from a crucial defect: the assumption by the IRS that engaging in political speech and political activity do not “promote social welfare.”  We live in a society in which an all-too-powerful federal government regulates almost every facet of Americans’ lives, businesses, and […]

Filed Under: In the News, Quotes CCP

In the News: RNLA: Would the Far Left Required Disclosure for the NAACP in the 40s and 50s?

By Michael B. Thielen Former Federal Election Commission (FEC) Chair, Professor and RNLA Member Brad Smith has an excellent article tearing down the house of cards that is the argument for the IRS regulation of politics.  Smith points out that really this effort to so involve the IRS is an end run around the bipartisan […]

Filed Under: In the News, Quotes CCP

Policy Primer: The National Popular Vote Proposal – A Step Away from Federalism and a Step Towards Chaos

This Policy Primer briefly reviews and summarizes five key shortcomings of the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact (NPV) and debunks the four most common myths associated with this plan for electing the President, which is quietly being signed onto in state legislatures across the country. The NPV proposal is an attempt to get states to agree […]

Filed Under: Electoral College, Research, Center for Competitive Politics, Checks and Balances, Electoral College, Founding Fathers, National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, npv, Policy Primer, Tara Ross, Electoral College, Electoral College, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District Of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.