NPR: South Dakotans Voted For Tougher Ethics Laws, But Lawmakers Object (In the News)

NPR: South Dakotans Voted For Tougher Ethics Laws, But Lawmakers Object

By Peter Overby

South Dakota’s citizen-led experiment to “drain the swamp” of political corruption appears to have lasted less than three months.

Lawmakers in the state Senate voted 27-8 Wednesday to repeal the voter-approved initiative and send the measure to the governor. The legislation was given emergency status so it would take effect immediately when the governor applies his signature – which he said he expects to do.
The state’s voters supported Donald Trump in a landslide last November. They also gave a 51 percent majority to a ballot initiative called the South Dakota Accountability and Anti-Corruption Act… 

Some critics say the initiative is a bait-and-switch, promising to drain the swamp but then suppressing free speech.

“The bait is anti-corruption, right?” said Scott Blackburn, a research fellow at the anti-regulatory Center for Competitive Politics in Alexandria, Va. “The switch is then to target a broad array of charitable organizations, and anyone who falls even close to the purview of talking about something kind of campaign related.”

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.