KUNC Colorado: Reps. Buck And Polis Want Better Enforcement Of Campaign Finance Laws (In the News)

By Michael De Yoanna
Twelve members of Congress are supporting the Restoring Integrity to America’s Election Act, including two from Colorado: Reps. Ken Buck and Jared Polis, a Republican and a Democrat, respectively.
Buck said the commission was “set up in a way that invited deadlock, and that’s just what we’ve got.”…
The act seeks to reduce the number of commissioners from six to five. No more than two members of the commission could be from the same party. A fifth proposed commissioner would be the chairperson and nominated by the president and confirmed by the Senate for a 10-year term.
Groups like Issue One, a bipartisan advocacy organization focused on government ethics and political reform, are supporting the legislation as a way to restore enforcement surrounding money in politics.
Other groups, like the Center for Competitive Politics, worry that the bill’s deciding presidential pick would create an ideological tilt on the commission.
“It would transform campaign finance law enforcement into a partisan exercise, no matter how the agency markets itself,” the group said in a press release.

Filed Under: In the News, Quotes CCP

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  In the News KUNC Colorado: Reps. Buck And Polis Want Better Enforcement Of Campaign Finance Laws By Michael De Yoanna Twelve members of Congress are supporting the Restoring Integrity to America’s Election Act, including two from Colorado: Reps. Ken Buck and Jared Polis, a Republican and a Democrat, respectively. Buck said the commission was […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

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In the News Forbes: Stop Using ‘Special Interests’ As An Insult By Joe Albanese The way the term “special interests” is used in practice suggests that it’s simply shorthand for “bad thing my opponent supports.” After all, depending on one’s views, “special interests” may encompass big business or big labor, fossil fuel or green energy […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Forbes: Stop Using ‘Special Interests’ As An Insult (In the News)

By Joe Albanese
The way the term “special interests” is used in practice suggests that it’s simply shorthand for “bad thing my opponent supports.” After all, depending on one’s views, “special interests” may encompass big business or big labor, fossil fuel or green energy companies, and single-issue and ideological groups like the Club for Growth or EMILY’s List.
In fact, one can fairly say that all of those groups are “special interests.” And that’s okay.
“Special interests” – or the more fitting term, advocacy groups – simplify democracy rather than subvert it. Most Americans don’t have the time or ability to analyze legislation, organize grassroots activity, or follow the ins and outs of the political process. Advocacy groups bridge the gap between citizens and government. They communicate their members’ views to public officials and inform the public of important political developments. For every advocacy group with one viewpoint, there is almost certainly another one making the opposite case. Some groups you’ll support, and others you’ll oppose, but they all contribute to the exchange of ideas that makes democracy work.

Filed Under: In the News, Joe Albanese, Published Articles

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Supreme Court Courthouse News Service: Justices Reject Alabama Campaign-Finance Case By Dan McCue The Supreme Court said Monday they won’t take up a case challenging Alabama’s ban on the transfer of campaign contributions between political action committees. The decision of the justices left in place an 11th Circuit ruling that the 2010 law does not […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links, Uncategorized

Daily Media Links 4/25: U.S. top court preserves Alabama campaign finance curbs, Bill Would Force Maine-Based PACs to Shed Light on Secretive Contributors, and more…

Free Speech Washington Post: A scholar asks, ‘Can democracy survive the Internet?’ By Dan Balz The rise and power of the Internet has accelerated the decline of institutions that once provided a mediating force in campaigns. Neither the legacy media nor the established political parties exercise the power they once had as referees, particularly in […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Constitutional and Practical Issues with Colorado House Bills 17-1261 and 17-1262

VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL The Honorable Vicki Marble The Honorable Jerry Sonnenberg RE: Constitutional and Practical Issues with House Bills 17-1261 and 17-1262 Dear Chair Marble, Vice-Chair Sonnenberg, and Members of the Senate State, Veterans, and Military Affairs Committee: On behalf of the Center for Competitive Politics (“the Center”),[1] we respectfully submit the following comments on […]

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Comments, Disclosure State, External Relations Comments and Testimony, State Comments and Testimony, disclaimers, Electioneering Communications, Colorado

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CCP Trust No One – Except Politicians? By Luke Wachob Just as most of us wouldn’t leave it up to McDonald’s and Burger King to tell us how healthy a cheeseburger is, we shouldn’t leave it up to political candidates to tell us the whole truth about their voting record, character, and qualifications for office. […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

An Amendment to Restrict Political Speech Rights

At a recent town hall meeting in his district, Representative Ted Deutch (D-FL) renewed his perennial call to amend the Constitution to give incumbent politicians unprecedented power to regulate any money raised or spent “to influence elections.” Of course, money spent for the purpose of influencing elections is primarily money spent on speech. And presumably, […]

Filed Under: Amending Press Release/In the News/Blog, Amending the Constitution, Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Issues, First Amendment, independent speech, Ted Deutch, Tom Udall, U.S. Constitution, Udall Amendment, Florida, New Mexico

Trust No One – Except Politicians?

Here’s a strange bit of advice I bet you haven’t heard before: trust politicians, but be wary of everyone else. It’s strange advice because it’s such bad advice. Politicians lie. Everyone knows politicians lie. They distort their positions to better match public opinion. They exploit political ignorance to fuel outrage at their opponents. They dodge […]

Filed Under: Amending Press Release/In the News/Blog, Amending the Constitution, Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Federal Press Releases and Blogs, Issues, Super PACs, Claire McCaskill, congress, independent speech, Negative ads, Tom Udall, Udall Amendment, Missouri

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.