CPI: Democrats say ‘Citizens United’ should die. Here’s why that won’t happen. (In the News)

By Sarah Kleiner
Seizing on the specter of Russian election influence, they’ve ramped up their quixotic effort – with minimal effect – to blunt Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, the controversial 2010 Supreme Court decision that unleashed a torrent of special interest spending on U.S. elections.
In doing so, they’ve introduced two dozen bills related to money in politics…
Bradley A. Smith, a former Republican chairman of the FEC, said campaign finance deregulation, in general, makes sense.
Smith, founder and chairman of pro-deregulation nonprofit Center for Competitive Politics, sees many of the Democratic proposals on the table now as efforts to rig the system in their favor.
The FEC, for example, isn’t as divided as some people make it out to be; the vast majority of money raised and spent in U.S. elections is already disclosed; and government probably shouldn’t be in the business of financing campaigns, he said.
There’s strong reason to believe people such as Sens. Chuck Schumer and Sheldon Whitehouse want reform because “they think it will stifle speech that opposes their agenda,” Smith said.

Filed Under: Brad Smith, In the News, Quotes CCP

CPI: Statehouses, not Congress, hosting biggest political money fights (In the News)

By Ashley Balcerzak
State lawmakers this year are engaging in full-throated debate on campaign finance proposals – with some surprising outcomes.
New Mexico’s secretary of state may have found a way to enact rules that the governor vetoed months before…
In April, Gov. Susana Martinez, a Republican, vetoed legislation that doubled contribution limits but tightened donor-disclosure rules.
Just two months later, newly elected Democratic Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver proposed a campaign-finance rule that included elements of the failed bill, though not the increased contribution limits. This angered opponents of increased disclosure requirements…
“The proposed rule attempts to legislate rather than implement existing law,” Tyler Martinez, an attorney with the conservative Center for Competitive Politics and no relation to New Mexico’s governor, wrote in public testimony to the secretary of state.

Filed Under: In the News, Quotes CCP

Daily Media Links 8/31: Campaign regulation foes targeting state-level restrictions, The New Strategy for Limiting Money’s Role in Elections, and more…

In the News CPI: Statehouses, not Congress, hosting biggest political money fights By Ashley Balcerzak State lawmakers this year are engaging in full-throated debate on campaign finance proposals – with some surprising outcomes. New Mexico’s secretary of state may have found a way to enact rules that the governor vetoed months before… In April, Gov. […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Campaign Finance Regulations Don’t Exist to Make Politicians’ Lives Easier

Issue One’s series of interviews with former lawmakers continued last week with a discussion featuring Charlie Bass, a Republican Congressman from New Hampshire from 1995 to 2007 and 2011 to 2013. Bass is a member of Issue One’s “ReFormers Caucus” of former government officials and representatives who support Issue One’s agenda of political speech regulation. […]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Federal, Contribution Limits Press Release/In the News/Blog, Issues, Money in Politics, Charlie Bass, Fundraising, Issue One

Daily Media Links 8/30: Draft rules on campaign disclosures draw over 800 comments, Beneficial Ownership Disclosure: A Huge Donor Disclosure Threat, and more…

In the News Americans for Prosperity: Prosperity Podcast #75: Are Democracy Vouchers Good or Bad for Democracy? Should you be taxed to fund political campaigns? Seattle has experimented with so-called democracy vouchers, or tax financed campaigns, and the results haven’t been good. Property taxes on businesses and individuals in the Emerald City have been hiked by […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Los Angeles Times: Judge invalidates law that would have allowed public financing of political campaigns in California (In the News)

By Patrick McGreevy
A Superior Court judge has struck down a new law signed by Gov. Jerry Brown that would have allowed cities, counties and the state to provide public financing of political campaigns, ruling that it violates a ban on that use of taxpayer dollars established nearly 30 years ago, officials said Monday.
Judge Timothy M. Frawley in Sacramento ruled that the financing law, which was signed last September, “directly contradicts” Proposition 73, an initiative approved by voters in 1988 that bans use of public money for campaigns.
The judge ruled the new law did not “further the purpose” of Proposition 73, which is the only means in which the Legislature can amend a law passed by the voters…
“We are very pleased with the decision,” said Jon Coupal, president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn., which filed the lawsuit against Brown.
“It’s a misuse of taxpayer dollars when taxpayer dollars are limited,” Coupal added. “And you are in a situation where the government is picking winners and losers, because how do you decide who gets it [money] and who doesn’t?”

Filed Under: In the News, In the News Our Cases

Daily Media Links 8/29: New Mexico Hears Final Comments on Campaign Finance Rules, Activists seek to limit outside campaign money, and more…

CCP Constitutional and Practical Issues with New Mexico Secretary of State Revised Proposed Rule 1.10.13 NMAC By Tyler Martinez The Center submitted substantive comments on the first iteration of the Proposed Rule, and I appreciate the opportunity to further aid your office in promulgating constitutionally-sound rules that protect First Amendment activity. While the promulgation of […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Court Strikes Down Attempt to Allow Taxpayer-Funded Campaigns

Alexandria, VA –  A Sacramento County Superior Court judge struck down a law passed late last year to allow state and some local governments to enact taxpayer financing of political campaigns.  The Court ruled the Legislature’s attempt to bypass a vote of the people on such legislation violated the California Constitution and the 1974 Political […]

Filed Under: Blog, hjta v Brown, Newsroom, Press Releases, Tax Financed Campaigns Press Release/In the News/Blog, Tax-Financing, Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association, Political Reform Act of 1974, Proposition 73, Quentin Kopp, California

Americans for Prosperity: Prosperity Podcast #75: Are Democracy Vouchers Good or Bad for Democracy? (In the News)

Should you be taxed to fund political campaigns? Seattle has experimented with so-called democracy vouchers, or tax financed campaigns, and the results haven’t been good. Property taxes on businesses and individuals in the Emerald City have been hiked by $3 million per year to finance these campaigns, and the money has almost all gone to incumbents. Other cities, including Washington, D.C., are considering joining Seattle in tax financed campaigns. Scott Blackburn, a senior research analyst at the Center for Competitive Politics, joins the podcast to explain why that’s a bad idea.

Filed Under: Broadcast, Video, Audio, In the News, Quotes CCP, Scott Blackburn

Constitutional and Practical Issues with New Mexico Secretary of State Revised Proposed Rule 1.10.13 NMAC

VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL Hon. Maggie Toulouse Oliver, New Mexico Secretary of State Capitol Annex North 325 Don Gaspar Suite 300 Santa Fe, N.M. 87501 RE: Constitutional and Practical Issues with Revised Proposed Rule 1.10.13 NMAC Dear Secretary Toulouse Oliver: On behalf of the Center for Competitive Politics (“the Center”),[1] I respectfully submit these comments concerning […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Disclosure, Disclosure Comments, Disclosure State, External Relations Comments and Testimony, Issues, State, State Comments and Testimony, coordination, Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver, New Mexico

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.