Daily Media Links 8/28: Scott backs Corcoran’s push to eliminate public campaign financing, New disclosure of hidden California campaign donors faces a do-or-die moment, and more…

In the News The Hill: Spending money in politics is part of our cherished freedom of speech By Joe Albanese Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) recently introduced a constitutional amendment that would allow politicians in Washington to limit money that can be spent on campaign speech, as well as give taxpayer dollars to politicians. Rep. Ro […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links, Uncategorized

Daily Caller: The Swamp Drain, By The Numbers (In the News)

By Jack Crowe
There were 9,791 registered lobbyists at the end of June, the lowest number at any point since 2008, and special interest spending on lobbying reached its lowest point in the last decade in the second quarter of 2017, according to a Boston Globe review of the last decade of lobbying data collected by the Center for Responsive Politics.
The Trump administration’s legislative agenda has been marred by a failure to achieve a bipartisan coalition on major legislative priorities. The failure of GOP leadership to whip the necessary votes required for Obamacare repeal in early July likely serves as a signal to special interests that the legislative arena will remain resistant to major breakthroughs for the foreseeable future.
“There’s nothing happening,” Center for Competitive Politics President David Keating told The Daily Caller News Foundation. “The fact that nothing is really happening, no legislation is really going anywhere, which means that no one feels the need to ramp up. The biggest bill that came down the pike was the health care bill and nothing came of it.”

Filed Under: David Keating, In the News, Quotes CCP

What’s the Value of “Outside Speech” Anyway?

Far outside the boundaries of the continental United States, Alaska’s stringent campaign finance regulations go a step further in distinguishing The Last Frontier from its counterparts. One such regulation that is particularly contentious is an aggregate limit on contributions from non-residents to Alaska candidates, groups, and political parties. Say there is an individual, Betty, who […]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Press Release/In the News/Blog, Contribution Limits State, Issues, McCutcheon v. FEC, Money in Politics, State, State Press Releases and Blogs, aggregate limits, Bluman v. FEC, First-Come First-Served Limits, Out-of-State Donors, Thompson v. Hebdon, Alaska

The Hill: Spending money in politics is part of our cherished freedom of speech (In the News)

By Joe Albanese
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) recently introduced a constitutional amendment that would allow politicians in Washington to limit money that can be spent on campaign speech, as well as give taxpayer dollars to politicians. Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.) has proposed a bill banning congressional candidates from receiving money from political action committees (PACs).
The latter is a particularly stunning attack on the free speech rights of groups of citizens, since PACs are highly regulated organizations that have been part of American elections since the 1940s and can give no more than $5,000 to a candidate. All they do is allow like-minded citizens to join together and pool their contributions in order to promote candidates or causes.
The proposals of these California Democrats would basically give powerful government bureaucrats the final word as to how much you are allowed to spend to express your opinions. Since controlling money means controlling speech, these efforts would greatly undermine the liberties of individuals and organizations alike.

Filed Under: In the News, Joe Albanese, Published Articles

Daily Media Links 8/25: The Most Shortsighted Attack on Free Speech in Modern U.S. History, (Still) Seeking IRS Accountability, and more…

Free Speech Washington Post: UC Berkeley chancellor’s message on free speech By Eugene Volokh “The law is very clear; public institutions like UC Berkeley must permit speakers invited in accordance with campus policies to speak, without discrimination in regard to point of view… But the most powerful argument for free speech is not one of […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Huffington Post: “Dark Money” Fell in 2016, but is that Good News? (In the News)

By Luke Wachob
The ability to support causes privately is probably less important to the wealthy than anyone else. People who give millions of dollars to political causes can afford the security they need to be safe from potential harassers. It is the rest of us who might have reason to worry about declaring our political affiliations next to our name, home address, and employer. Yet federal law says that information must be disclosed when a donor gives just $200 to a candidate, PAC, or party.
We should be glad that a small role remains for groups that are unable to comply with the burdens of campaign finance regulations. Forcing citizen groups to operate like PACs would only further alienate Americans from public policy. And in the era of Trump, the benefits of donor privacy are increasingly recognized by progressives.
Surely there are wealthy donors who contribute to nonprofits. But new disclosure rules would barely inconvenience them; they can and do spend most of their political money elsewhere. More importantly, advocacy nonprofits are the best avenue available for average Americans to associate privately in support of a cause without fear of harassment and intimidation. That side of the equation should not be ignored.

Filed Under: In the News, Luke Wachob, Published Articles

Daily Media Links 8/24: ‘Get Tough or Shut Up’: The Malicious Spirit Loose in the Land, Bill to Bring Light to Campaign Financing Heads to California Senate, and more…

In the News Huffington Post: “Dark Money” Fell in 2016, but is that Good News? By Luke Wachob The ability to support causes privately is probably less important to the wealthy than anyone else. People who give millions of dollars to political causes can afford the security they need to be safe from potential harassers. […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Issue One Interview Unwittingly Undermines Narrative of Campaign Finance Corruption

Last week, Issue One – a group that advocates for greater regulation of political speech – published an interview with former Congressman Mike Castle. Castle was a Republican representative from Delaware from 1993 to 2011, and governor of the state from 1985 to 1992. He’s also a member of Issue One’s “ReFormers Caucus,” a group […]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Federal, Contribution Limits Press Release/In the News/Blog, Issues, Money in Politics, Super PACs, corruption, Fundraising, Issue One, Mike Castle

Daily Media Links 8/23: What gives censors any right to censor?, Justice Department Backtracks on Collecting Data of Visitors to an Anti-Trump Website, and more…

Free Speech Richmond Times-Dispatch: What gives censors any right to censor? By A. Barton Hinkle “The ACLU Needs to Rethink Free Speech,” argues a fellow with the UCLA School of Law. “Censor White Supremacy,” advocates a writer in The Week. “Speech in America is Fast, Cheap, and Out of Control,” bemoans campaign-finance scourge Richard Hasen […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Daily Media Links 8/22: So, just how guaranteed is your freedom of speech online?, Citizens United Fights to Keep Donor Names Secret, and more…

Free Speech New York Post: So, just how guaranteed is your freedom of speech online? By John Samples Most Americans won’t worry much about neo-Nazis losing access to the public forum we call the Internet. Their ideas are repugnant, and we did fight a war against their kind not that long ago. End of story? […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.