Washington Post: Provisions attached to budget bills could reshape campaign finance laws (In the News)

Washington Post: Provisions attached to budget bills could reshape campaign finance laws

By Michelle Ye Hee Lee

The most significant and best-known proposal would repeal part of the Johnson Amendment, which limits political activity by tax-exempt churches and nonprofit groups…

“I think that many of the religious organizations make a good point that they should be able to endorse candidates from the pulpit,” said David Keating, president of the nonprofit Institute for Free Speech, which opposes limits on political speech and advertising…

Another budget rider, this one attached to the Senate version of the budget bill, would relax caps on the amount of money that candidates can spend in coordination with their parties for communications…

One provision in the House budget bill would prevent new rules requiring businesses seeking federal contracts to disclose their political spending.

It also continues two riders already written into existing law: One blocks the Securities and Exchange Commission from acting on proposed rules that would require publicly traded companies to disclose their political contributions to shareholders; another blocks the Internal Revenue Service from creating new standards for “dark money” groups, which are not required to disclose their donors or political spending.

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.