Washington Examiner: Don’t give the IRS personal information it doesn’t need (In the News)

Washington Examiner: Don’t give the IRS personal information it doesn’t need

By Bradley A. Smith

For many years now, the IRS has required nonprofits to report their major donors to the IRS on what is known as Form 990, Schedule B. Recognizing the sensitive nature of this information, however, charitable organizations are not required to make this information public, and the IRS is prohibited by law from making it public.

Unfortunately, the IRS is not always successful at keeping the information secret…

Moreover, this information can be used improperly within the IRS. Certainly, most IRS employees are fair and responsible, but it only takes a handful of bad apples to use this information to harass citizens for the views and causes supported by their charitable giving.

The form is also an administrative burden for charities. The Institute for Free Speech estimates that Schedule B repeal would save charities and other nonprofits an estimated $63 million in costs spent complying with the dictates of the form…

Rep. Peter Roskam, R-Ill., has taken a first step to ending abuses of privacy by introducing H.R. 4916, the Preventing IRS Abuse and Protecting Free Speech Act, which would reverse current law and prohibit the IRS from collecting this information. This legislation passed the House in the last Congress, but was not taken up in the Senate. Its best chance to pass this year will be through its inclusion in the omnibus budget bill currently being negotiated in both chambers.


The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.