Daily Signal: Connecticut Limits Free Speech Using Campaign Finance Rules (In the News)

Fred Lucas
The state’s sanction against the legislative candidates was for mentioning Connecticut Gov. Dan Malloy, a Democrat, by name in mailings that referenced “Malloy’s bad policies” and “Malloy’s tax hike” for their own races in 2014, when Malloy was also on the ballot. The lawmakers used similar reference in campaign literature this year and in 2012, but face no sanction because Malloy appeared on the 2014 ballot….
“What Connecticut is trying to do is both ridiculous and likely unconstitutional,” Keating told The Daily Signal in an email.
Still, Keating added that politicizing a program was likely inevitable once the state has the purse strings to campaign funding.
“A government that funds speech will seek to control that speech,” Keating said. “Bureaucrats who control the funding will try to penalize candidates for trivial violations.”

Filed Under: In the News, Quotes CCP

Daily Media Links 9/6: Super PAC spending hits $500 million, while 501(c)s hit the brakes, Nonprofit Structure Backfires on ‘Our Revolution,’ and more…

In the News The Hill: Before reforming the FEC look at Montana’s mess Paul Jossey One corollary to the political-money obsession is the complaint that Federal Election Commission enforcement for alleged wrongdoers is too feeble. Critics say its bipartisan structure hampers its ability to regulate all this spending. But the commission’s structure is no accident. […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Vote Smart: Campaign Finance: Free Speech, or Another Platform for Corruption? (In the News)

Haley Engle
Some political analysts, such as Paul Jacob, have suggested that it is in America’s best interest to actually decrease campaign funding regulations even further. According to Jacob, though the current system allows the potential for a group of wealthy donors to fund campaigns that would otherwise flop, the voters still ultimately decide on each candidacy.
On a similar note, Bradley Smith says that the best solution to the campaign finance debate is to simply embrace the higher spending. He says that in this case, “the cure is worse than the disease”. Before Buckley v. Valeo in 1976, the concept of regulating campaign finance was virtually non-existent. Smith argues that legislative responses to the increase in “big money” have done next to nothing to prevent it from continuing, therefore we are better off allowing money to send a mass message.

Filed Under: In the News, Quotes CCP

Daily Media Links 9/1: How the Exxon Case Unraveled, The Real Clinton Foundation Revelation, and more…

In the News Vote Smart: Campaign Finance: Free Speech, or Another Platform for Corruption? Haley Engle Some political analysts, such as Paul Jacob, have suggested that it is in America’s best interest to actually decrease campaign funding regulations even further. According to Jacob, though the current system allows the potential for a group of wealthy […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Daily Media Links 8/31: Addicted to Making Campaign Contributions?, The Clinton scandals: No, everyone does not do it, and more…

Campaign Donors The Atlantic: Addicted to Making Campaign Contributions? Russell Berman And if the Sanders campaign and its predecessors resembled a casino trying to turn its first-time customers into regulars, then supporters like Bryant and Grace are its slot-machine donors. They responded to the campaign’s pleas nearly every time. And like more than 1,500 other […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Observer: Supreme Court Leaves Intact New Delaware Law That Expands Disclosure (In the News)

Jeff Brindle
On June 28, 2016, the High Court refused to hear an appeal in Delaware Strong Families v. Matthew Denn, Attorney General of Delaware.
In denying certiorari, the tribunal let stand a ruling by the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, which upheld Delaware’s disclosure of “third party advertisements.”
Delaware’s Election Disclosure Act requires any non-candidate or political party organization to file a “third party advertisement” report if more than $500 is spent on electioneering communications…
One highly unusual aspect of the case is that it applied the disclosure requirements to a 501(c)3 group, which is considered a charity under IRS law. In the past, such groups have avoided disclosure rules.
The appeals judges stated: “…we conclude that it is the conduct of the organization, rather than an organization’s status with the Internal Revenue Service, that determines whether it makes communications subject to the (Delaware) Act.”
Although US Supreme Court Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito would have granted certiorari, the majority of justices agreed with the Appeals Court’s ruling in favor of disclosure, even in the case of a voter guide.

Filed Under: In the News, In the News Our Cases

Daily Media Links 8/30: Judge dismisses Citizens United challenge to New York donor rules, A Campaign Finance Ruling and its Unintended Consequences, and more…

In the News Observer: Supreme Court Leaves Intact New Delaware Law That Expands Disclosure Jeff Brindle On June 28, 2016, the High Court refused to hear an appeal in Delaware Strong Families v. Matthew Denn, Attorney General of Delaware. In denying certiorari, the tribunal let stand a ruling by the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Argus Leader: Koch brothers-backed group says ballot measure could invite lawsuits (In the News)

Dana Ferguson
In the assessment, an analyst said the so-called “South Dakota Government Accountability and Anti-Corruption Act” would require reporting of political speech and donations and it would impose a “straightjacket” on fundraising.
“We’re just putting the issues out there and alerting people to the legal issues that could arise,” Eric Wang, Center for Competitive Politics analyst, said. The group didn’t endorse or oppose the measure.
Supporters of the proposal said the response wasn’t surprising, given the Center for Competitive Politics’ history of suing cities and states that enact similar laws.
“This is a group with an ax to grind,” Paul S. Ryan, deputy executive director of the Campaign Legal Center, said Friday.

Filed Under: In the News, Quotes CCP

South Dakota War College: Center for Competitive Politics: IM22 is bad law, and full of unintended consequences. Check it out for yourself! (In the News)

Pat Powers
The Center for Competitive Politics, which devotes it’s efforts to preserving free speech, has taken a hard look at Slick Rick Weiland’s measure to fund political campaigns from taxpayer funds – Initiated Measure 22 – and has found it wanting in several areas they describe in a report they recently issued which points out more flaws than have been identified to date…
So, in addition to the payola for politicians at taxpayer expense, it may cut off one of the State Democrat Party’s few sources of revenue – selling their lists? That’s funny. Even funnier – it sounds as if the measure passed, it would also prevent candidates from selling off old office equipment, furniture, and other assets.
But don’t take my word for it – read the entire document yourself, and catch the multitude of sins & flaws they’ve identified with initiated measure 22.

Filed Under: In the News, Quotes CCP

Daily Media Links 8/29: Clinton’s vow threatens the First Amendment, Judge tosses out effort to keep Missouri campaign contribution limits off ballot, and more…

CCP Campaign Finance Regulations Increase the Influence of Super PACs Joe Albanese Traditional political actors, such as candidates and parties, are increasingly seeing their public platform encroached by ads from independent groups. Some candidates have tried to harness the potential of independent expenditures by outsourcing advertising and other operations to friendly super PACs, but this […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.