DoubleSpeak: "Dark Money"

This is the second in a series of posts analyzing the language used in debates about campaign finance laws and regulations. Supporters of increased regulation of campaign financing, like all public policy advocates, have a specific lexicon that they use in order to bolster their arguments and convince the public that action is needed. Unfortunately, […]

Filed Under: Blog

15 Things Vox Forgot to Mention about “Money in Politics” (Part II)

Vox.com’s “40 charts that explain money in politics” fails miserably at, well, explaining money in politics. The charts seem to be less an explanation and more unproven innuendo about why money is supposedly ruining American democracy. What the collection of charts does do, however, is provide a window into some of the common misconceptions about […]

Filed Under: Blog, Money in Politics, corruption, Disclosure, Good Governance, Vox

15 Things Vox Forgot to Mention about “Money in Politics” (Part I)

Vox.com’s “40 charts that explain money in politics” fails miserably at, well, explaining money in politics. The charts seem to be less an explanation and more unproven innuendo about why money is supposedly ruining American democracy. What the collection of charts does do, however, is provide a window into some of the common misconceptions about […]

Filed Under: Blog, Money in Politics

New York Post: New York’s ‘shut up’ rule (In the News)

By Scott Blackburn Imagine you hear a radio ad where your state representative — let’s call him Fred — claims to oppose higher taxes. But you know that Fred voted three times for higher taxes. Outraged, you print up 500 flyers with a picture of Fred, a copy of his voting record on taxes and a brief statement […]

Filed Under: Disclosure Press Release/In the News/Blog, In the News, Money in Politics, Published Articles

Washington Times: For FEC, it’s disclosure for thee, but not for me (In the News)

By Scott Blackburn The three Democratic appointees on the commission wanted to proceed with an intrusive investigation of the group, pointing to a document by the FEC’s general counsel making the case for proceeding. The three Republican appointees disagreed, pointing to a separate, earlier document from the FEC’s general counsel, which the three Democratic commissioners […]

Filed Under: CCP v. FEC Other Links, In the News, In the News Our Cases, Published Articles

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio’s false statement law impedes political discourse (In the News)

By Scott Blackburn In the recent unanimous Supreme Court decision, Susan B. Anthony List v. Driehaus, the court expressed deep skepticism about this type of political gamesmanship and ruled that a lower court erred in refusing to even consider whether the law is unconstitutional. The law, quite simply, puts bureaucrats (whose salaries are controlled by incumbents) in a position of […]

Filed Under: In the News, Published Articles

Is the IRS Investigation Worth the Cost?

The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform held a hearing, on Wednesday, titled, “IRS Abuses: Ensuring that Targeting Never Happens Again.”  The hearing covered many potentially useful proposals to prevent future political targeting by the IRS – from placing a time limit on the IRS’s review process for tax-exempt organizations to reforming civil service laws […]

Filed Under: Blog, IRS, IRS and the Tea Party

DoubleSpeak: "Campaign Finance Reform"

This is the first in a series of posts analyzing the language used in debates about campaign finance laws and regulations. Supporters of increased regulation of campaign financing, like all public policy advocates, have a specific lexicon that they use in order to bolster their arguments and convince the public that action is needed. Unfortunately, […]

Filed Under: Blog

What Sen. Schumer and Rep. Deutch Get Wrong About the Senate’s Constitutional Amendment Proposal

On Tuesday, Sen. Chuck Schumer and Rep. Ted Deutch penned an opinion piece in Politico Magazine purporting to respond to criticisms of a Democratic effort to amend the Constitution to overturn Buckley v. Valeo and Citizens United v. FEC. It, unfortunately, is riddled with obfuscations, straw man arguments, and factual inaccuracies. The entire article is […]

Filed Under: Blog

Money Still Doesn’t “Buy Elections”

Last Wednesday, The Washington Post’s Jonathan Capehart wrote a noteworthy piece criticizing former Republican Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich for his inane statements regarding former New York City mayor, Michael Bloomberg. Gingrich said that he, “[had] every problem with Mayor Bloomberg being able to buy the election in New York” – a claim that […]

Filed Under: Blog

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.