Broadcast, Video, Audio

The Steve Gruber Show: Zac Morgan: No “reasonable expectation of privacy” from your phone’s location data (In the News)

Zac Morgan, is a staff attorney at the Institute for Free Speech and an Opinion contributor to USA Today. The government says you have no “reasonable expectation of privacy” from your phone’s location data. And the government believes that it should be able to get your location history from your phone provider on, more-or-less, its own say-so. 

Filed Under: Broadcast, Video, Audio, In the News

Urban Family Talk: Stacy on the Right (Audio) (In the News)

Institute for Free Speech Attorney Zac Morgan discusses the Fist Amendment implications of the Supreme Court case Carpenter v. United States (beginning at 19:00).

Filed Under: Broadcast, Video, Audio, In the News

Americans for Prosperity: Prosperity Podcast #80: Honest Ads Act is a Threat to Free Speech (In the News)

After the 2016 elections, it was revealed that foreign agents bought around $100,000 in social media ads. In response, some members of the House and Senate are seeking stricter regulations on political speech on social media. Is this a necessary step to preserve the integrity of American elections or another example of the erosion of free speech? In this episode, Ed is joined by Allen Dickerson, the legal director for the Institute for Free Speech, who highlights the dangers to speech of regulating online speech.

Filed Under: Allen Dickerson, Broadcast, Video, Audio, In the News

Daily Journal: Honest Ads Act: Honestly Overbroad? (In the News)

As tech titans reckon with disruptive foreign interference, Congress debates the Honest Ads Act, aimed at exposing invidious overseas actors. Eric Wang (Institute for Free Speech) argues the legislation would mostly target Americans exercising constitutionally-protected political speech.

Filed Under: Broadcast, Video, Audio, Eric Wang, In the News, Quotes CCP

Center for Individual Freedom: The “Honest Ads Act” Threatens Free Speech (Audio) (In the News)

Bradley A. Smith, Chairman and Founder of the Institute for Free Speech and Former Chairman of the Federal Election Commission, discusses the so-called “Honest Ads Act,” how the proposed legislation would impose more burdens on Americans’ free speech rights, and the problems with extending the existing “electioneering communication” FEC disclaimer language to social media ads. 

Filed Under: Brad Smith, Broadcast, Video, Audio, In the News

Bloomberg Radio: Bloomberg Law Brief: New Legislation for Online Ads (Audio) (In the News)

Bradley Smith, a professor at Capital University Law School and former chairman of the Federal Election Commission, discusses a new bipartisan plan in the Senate to regulate online advertising after foreign interference in the 2016 U.S. election. He speaks with June Grasso on Bloomberg Radio’s Bloomberg Law. 

Filed Under: Brad Smith, Broadcast, Video, Audio, In the News

United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit: Public Confidence in the Election Process (Video)

Legal challenges involving political campaigns or elections present some of the most difficult, high-profile, and time-sensitive matters to come before federal courts. They also may test the bounds of judicial independence and the appearance of impartiality. Their consequences are often far-reaching. A panel of three distinguished election law experts will participate in a conversation to help navigate through this thicket. They will discuss perennial issues arising in election law, such as the Voting Rights Act, redistricting, and the regulation of money in politics. They also will tackle several more recent hot topics, including voter fraud, voter suppression and protection, the regulation of micro-targeting, the Purcell principle (relating to court-ordered changes shortly before an election), the Electoral College, faithless electors, and foreign interference with U.S. elections.

Filed Under: Brad Smith, Broadcast, Video, Audio, In the News

Americans for Prosperity: Prosperity Podcast #75: Are Democracy Vouchers Good or Bad for Democracy? (In the News)

Should you be taxed to fund political campaigns? Seattle has experimented with so-called democracy vouchers, or tax financed campaigns, and the results haven’t been good. Property taxes on businesses and individuals in the Emerald City have been hiked by $3 million per year to finance these campaigns, and the money has almost all gone to incumbents. Other cities, including Washington, D.C., are considering joining Seattle in tax financed campaigns. Scott Blackburn, a senior research analyst at the Center for Competitive Politics, joins the podcast to explain why that’s a bad idea.

Filed Under: Broadcast, Video, Audio, In the News, Quotes CCP, Scott Blackburn

SiriusXM Patriot: David Keating on The First Amendment in the Social Media Age (In the News)

SiriusXM Patriot: David Keating on The First Amendment in the Social Media Age David Keating, President at the Center for Competitive Politics, speaks with Tom & Deneen Borelli about the First Amendment, Elected Officials and Social Media in light of lawsuits being filed by the ACLU on behalf of constituents who have been blocked by […]

Filed Under: Broadcast, Video, Audio, David Keating, In the News, Quotes CCP

Rio Grande Foundation: July 8, 2017 Edition of RGF Weekly Radio Show (In the News)

Paul sits down with Scott Blackburn from the Center for Competitive Politics to discuss efforts by New Mexico’s secretary of State to force organizations like Rio Grande Foundation to disclose their donors. They talk about campaign finance issues and why average Americans might not want to be listed in government databases. 

Filed Under: Broadcast, Video, Audio, In the News, Scott Blackburn

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.