Disclosure Handouts

Citizens United v. FEC: Facts and Falsehoods

“If the First Amendment has any force, it prohibits Congress from fining or jailing citizens, or associations of citizens, for simply engaging in political speech.” – Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 558 U.S. 310, 349 (2010) The U.S. Supreme Court’s 2010 ruling in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission struck down a provision of […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Issues, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, Disclosure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Disclosure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation

Super PACs: Expanding Freedom of Speech

“[T]he government can have no anti-corruption interest in limiting contributions to independent expenditure–only organizations.” – SpeechNow.org v. Federal Election Commission[1] The product of a 2010 court ruling, “super PACs” have been a boon to citizens wishing to more effectively speak about elections. Legally, they have ensured that Americans do not lose their First Amendment rights […]

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, Independent Speech, Issues, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Super PACs, SpeechNow.org v. FEC, The Media, Disclosure, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Disclosure, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation

A World Without Buckley v. Valeo

“The concept that government may restrict the speech of some elements of our society in order to enhance the relative voice of others is wholly foreign to the First Amendment.” – Buckley v. Valeo, 424 U.S. 1, 48 (1976) Decided over forty years ago, the landmark 1976 Supreme Court decision, Buckley v. Valeo, remains at […]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, Expenditure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Issues, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Money in Politics, Research, buckley, Buckley v. Valeo, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Expenditure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation

Seven Myths about Disclosure Masquerading as “Realities”

This Issue Brief by Center for Competitive Politics Senior Fellow Eric Wang[1] analyzes seven alleged “myths” about campaign finance disclosure as discussed by the pro-regulation Campaign Legal Center. The Campaign Legal Center (CLC) recently issued a briefing paper worthy of Lewis Carroll.[2] Purporting to explain “Seven Myths (and Realities) about Disclosure,”[3] the CLC paper instead […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Corporate Governance, Corporate Governance Handouts, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, Super PACs, Super PACs, Campaign Legal Center, Electioneering Communications, federal election commission, NAACP v. Alabama, Securities and Exchange Commission, Disclosure, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Disclosure, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Super PACs

The Victims of “Dark Money” Disclosure: How Government Reporting Requirements Suppress Speech and Limit Charitable Giving

In this Goldwater Institute Policy Report, author Jon Riches highlights the coordinated attack on private political speech under the banner of “dark money” and its dangerous effect on nonprofit organizations. As the report explains, anonymous political speech has been essential to democratic discourse since the founding of our republic. Indeed, ratification of the U.S. Constitution […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, First Amendment, Issue Advocacy, 501(c)(3)s, Dark Money, Goldwater Institute, Research (Disclosure), Disclosure, First Amendment, Issue Advocacy, Disclosure, First Amendment, Issue Advocacy, Arizona, California, Minnesota, Nevada, New York, Wisconsin

Five Misconceptions about “Dark Money”

“Dark money” is a pejorative term for spending on ads urging the election or defeat of candidates by nonprofit groups – typically 501(c)(4) social welfare organizations, 501(c)(5) labor unions, and 501(c)(6) trade associations – that do not report the names and addresses of their individual donors to the government, unless donations are earmarked to fund […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Federal, Disclosure Handouts, External Relations Sub-Pages, Independent Speech, Issues, Money in Politics, Research, Dark Money, Disclosure, Handouts (Disclosure), Research (Disclosure), Disclosure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Disclosure, First Amendment, Independent Speech

Three Primary Threats to 501(c)(3) Donor Privacy

Across the country, those who wish to silence dissent are seeking to force nonprofit groups to reveal the private information – names, home addresses, occupations, and employers – of their supporters to the government. This strategy, which is being employed in states across the ideological spectrum, and by officials of both parties, is intended to […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, Disclosure State, Research, "Incidental Committees", 501(c)(3)s, Electioneering Communications, Disclosure, Disclosure, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Kentucky, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Mexico, New York, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Washington

Misusing Disclosure: How a Policy Intended to Increase Voter Knowledge Often Misleads the Public

Misusing Disclosure How a Policy Intended to Increase Voter Knowledge Often Misleads the Public By Luke Wachob Compulsory disclosure laws force citizens who contribute to candidates or primarily political organizations to have their name, address, and employer made publicly available in a government database. Disclosure laws are intended to inform the public about the sources […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, External Relations Sub-Pages, Issue Advocacy, Research, ALEC, Brendan Eich, Center for Responsive Politics, CREW, John Edwards, Media Matters for America, Mozilla, Senator Durbin, Wesleyan Media Project, Disclosure, Issue Advocacy, Disclosure, Issue Advocacy

Policy Paper – H.B. 300, the Delaware Elections Disclosure Act

This Policy Paper analyzes H.B. 300, the Delaware Elections Disclosure Act of 2012, with a focus on two serious constitutional issues inherent in the legislation. Despite these issues, this legislation eventually passed both chambers of the General Assembly and was signed into law by Governor Jack Markell. You can read the Policy Paper here. http://ifs.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/2012-07-11_Policy-Paper_DE_H.B.-300_Elections-Disclosure-Act.pdf

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure Comments, Disclosure Handouts, Disclosure State, External Relations Sub-Pages, State, State Comments and Testimony, Center for Competitive Politics, Delaware, Deleware Elections Disclosure Act, H.B. 300, Jack Markell, Delaware

Election Law Handbook for Legislators and State Policymakers

This Election Law Handbook provides an informative guide to a variety of topics in campaign finance and election law likely to arise in any state legislative session. A useful tool for anyone interested in topical election law issues, in addition to original content, this Handbook suggests recommended reading for more in-depth analysis of the subjects discussed […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, Disclosure State, Electoral College, External Relations Sub-Pages, State, Tax Financed Campaigns Handouts, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax Financed Campaigns State, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Contribution Limits, Disclosure, Electoral College, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Electoral College, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District Of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.