Research

Citizens United v. FEC: Facts and Falsehoods

“If the First Amendment has any force, it prohibits Congress from fining or jailing citizens, or associations of citizens, for simply engaging in political speech.” – Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 558 U.S. 310, 349 (2010) The U.S. Supreme Court’s 2010 ruling in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission struck down a provision of […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Issues, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, Disclosure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Disclosure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation

Super PACs: Expanding Freedom of Speech

“[T]he government can have no anti-corruption interest in limiting contributions to independent expenditure–only organizations.” – SpeechNow.org v. Federal Election Commission[1] The product of a 2010 court ruling, “super PACs” have been a boon to citizens wishing to more effectively speak about elections. Legally, they have ensured that Americans do not lose their First Amendment rights […]

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, Independent Speech, Issues, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Super PACs, SpeechNow.org v. FEC, The Media, Disclosure, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Disclosure, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation

Risky Business? Corporate Political Spending, Shareholder Approval, and Stock Volatility

In this updated study by Associate Professor of Political Science and Business Administration at the University of Rochester, David Primo, and Saumya Prabhat, former Assistant Professor of Finance at the Indian School of Business and current Quantitative Analytics Supervisor at Freddie Mac, the authors utilize a quasi-natural experiment to examine whether disclosure and shareholder approval […]

Filed Under: Corporate Governance, Corporate Governance Research, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, External Relations Sub-Pages, Faulty Assumptions, Research, Activist Investing, and Referendums Act of 2000, Center for Competitive Politics, corporate disclosure, David Primo, Elections, First Amendment, Fortune 500 Companies, lobbying, money in politics, NCR, Neill Committee Report, Political Parties, PPERA, Saumya Prabhat, Shareholder Approval, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions

A World Without Buckley v. Valeo

“The concept that government may restrict the speech of some elements of our society in order to enhance the relative voice of others is wholly foreign to the First Amendment.” – Buckley v. Valeo, 424 U.S. 1, 48 (1976) Decided over forty years ago, the landmark 1976 Supreme Court decision, Buckley v. Valeo, remains at […]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, Expenditure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Issues, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Money in Politics, Research, buckley, Buckley v. Valeo, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Expenditure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation

New CCP Issue Analysis: Tax-Financed Campaigns Fail to Increase Political Competitiveness

States with taxpayer-funded campaigns have more candidates – but incumbents still dominate Alexandria, VA – Subsidizing candidate campaigns with tax dollars does not increase the odds of unseating an incumbent on Election Day. That’s the key finding of a new Issue Analysis released today by the Center for Competitive Politics, America’s largest nonprofit defending First Amendment […]

Filed Under: Blog, Newsroom, Press Releases, Tax Financed Campaigns Handouts, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax Financed Campaigns State, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns

Issue Analysis No. 10: Do Taxpayer-Funded Campaigns Increase Political Competitiveness?

The Center’s tenth issue analysis examines the claim by proponents of taxpayer-funded political campaigns that such systems improve the political process by exposing incumbent politicians to more competition and increasing the chance that challengers will defeat them in elections. If this claim is true, we would expect to find lower incumbent re-election rates in states […]

Filed Under: Blog, External Relations Sub-Pages, Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Handouts, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax Financed Campaigns State, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Arizona Citizens Clean Elections Act, CCEA, clean elections, Maine Clean Election Act, MCEA, public financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Arizona, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maine, Minnesota

Members of Congress Renew Proposal to Kill Bipartisan FEC

The bipartisan makeup of the Federal Election Commission is coming under fire yet again. A House bill (H.R. 2034) would effectively disband the FEC and replace the agency with a new, partisan model of campaign finance law enforcement. Perhaps recognizing how unpopular this idea would be if put in plain English, the proposal’s backers couch […]

Filed Under: Blog, Enforcement, IRS and the Tea Party, Issues, Derek Kilmer, FEC, federal election commission, HR 2034, Jim Renacci, Restoring Integrity to America's Elections Act, richard nixon, Watergate, Montana, Wisconsin

Self-Styled Campaign Finance “Reformers” Jump the Shark

Self-Styled Campaign Finance “Reformers” Jump the Shark Ten Stunts, Antics, and Exploits That Show Many Anti-Free Speech Activists Have Lost It By Luke Wachob Introduction What do activists do when the government isn’t prioritizing their cause? What does the head of a federal agency do when she doesn’t get her way? What do “good government” […]

Filed Under: Amending Press Release/In the News/Blog, Amending the Constitution, Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Enforcement, Faulty Assumptions, FEC, First Amendment, Issues, Money in Politics, Research, Super PACs, Super PACs, "John Doe", Ann Ravel, Democracy Spring, Doug Hughes, ellen weintraub, federal election commission, Gyrocopter, Larry Lessig, Mayday PAC, Udall Amendment, Zephyr Teachout, Enforcement, Faulty Assumptions, First Amendment, Enforcement, Faulty Assumptions, First Amendment, Super PACs, Wisconsin

Free Speech Under Fire: The Future of the First Amendment

In a set of remarks preceded by Brooklyn Law School President and Joseph Crea Dean Nicholas W. Allard, famed First Amendment lawyer Floyd Abrams muses on the recent and founding history of First Amendment law. Abrams is a longtime partner at Cahill Gordon & Reindel and was counsel on well-known First Amendment cases like the Pentagon […]

Filed Under: First Amendment, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, Antonin Scalia, Austin v. Michigan Chamber of Commerce, Bill of Rights, Brown v. EMA, corruption, Floyd Abrams, Founding Fathers, Hill v. Colorado, Nicholas W. Allard, Samuel Alito, Stephen Breyer, First Amendment, Jurisprudence & Litigation, First Amendment, Jurisprudence & Litigation

Freedom of Speech and Equality: Do We Have to Choose?

In this essay, Nadine Strossen, the John Marshall Harlan II Professor of Law at New York Law School and former president of the ACLU, argues that the principles of freedom of speech and equality are not in conflict, as is often claimed by those who criticize protections for hateful or offensive speech. Written as part […]

Filed Under: First Amendment, Research, ACLU, Campus Speech, Hate Speech, Nadine Strossen, First Amendment, First Amendment

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.