Research

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Risky Business? Corporate Political Spending, Shareholder Approval, and Stock Volatility

In this updated study by Associate Professor of Political Science and Business Administration at the University of Rochester, David Primo, and Saumya Prabhat, former Assistant Professor of Finance at the Indian School of Business and current Quantitative Analytics Supervisor at Freddie Mac, the authors utilize a quasi-natural experiment to examine whether disclosure and shareholder approval […]

Filed Under: Corporate Governance, Corporate Governance Research, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, External Relations Sub-Pages, Faulty Assumptions, Research, Activist Investing, and Referendums Act of 2000, Center for Competitive Politics, corporate disclosure, David Primo, Elections, First Amendment, Fortune 500 Companies, lobbying, money in politics, NCR, Neill Committee Report, Political Parties, PPERA, Saumya Prabhat, Shareholder Approval, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions

A World Without Buckley v. Valeo

“The concept that government may restrict the speech of some elements of our society in order to enhance the relative voice of others is wholly foreign to the First Amendment.” – Buckley v. Valeo, 424 U.S. 1, 48 (1976) Decided over forty years ago, the landmark 1976 Supreme Court decision, Buckley v. Valeo, remains at […]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, Expenditure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Issues, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Money in Politics, Research, buckley, Buckley v. Valeo, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Expenditure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation

Issue Analysis No. 10: Do Taxpayer-Funded Campaigns Increase Political Competitiveness?

The Center’s tenth issue analysis examines the claim by proponents of taxpayer-funded political campaigns that such systems improve the political process by exposing incumbent politicians to more competition and increasing the chance that challengers will defeat them in elections. If this claim is true, we would expect to find lower incumbent re-election rates in states […]

Filed Under: Blog, External Relations Sub-Pages, Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Handouts, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax Financed Campaigns State, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Arizona Citizens Clean Elections Act, CCEA, clean elections, Maine Clean Election Act, MCEA, public financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Arizona, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maine, Minnesota

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The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.