Contributions & Limits

A World Without Buckley v. Valeo

“The concept that government may restrict the speech of some elements of our society in order to enhance the relative voice of others is wholly foreign to the First Amendment.” – Buckley v. Valeo, 424 U.S. 1, 48 (1976) Decided over forty years ago, the landmark 1976 Supreme Court decision, Buckley v. Valeo, remains at […]

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A Landmark Decision Turns Forty: A Conversation on Buckley v. Valeo

In this series of essays by Brooklyn Law School President and Joseph Crea Dean Nicholas W. Allard, U.S. Court of Appeals Senior Judge and former U.S. Senator James L. Buckley, and former ACLU Executive Director Ira Glasser, the authors discuss the landmark Buckley v. Valeo Supreme Court decision after its 40th anniversary. Written as part […]

Filed Under: Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Expenditure, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, ACLU, Buckley v. Valeo, corporate speech, corruption, eugene mccarthy, FECA, Ira Glasser, James L. Buckley, Nicholas W. Allard, Contribution Limits, Disclosure, Expenditure, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Expenditure, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation

Free Speech Matters: The Roberts Court and the First Amendment

In this article, Brooklyn Law School Professor Joel M. Gora, a CCP Academic Advisor, examines the impact of the Roberts Court on First Amendment rights after ten years, particularly with regards to campaign finance law in cases like Citizens United v. FEC and McCutcheon v. FEC. Written as part of a symposium on “Free Speech Under Fire” […]

Filed Under: Contributions & Limits, Expenditure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Issue Advocacy, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Antonin Scalia, Arizona Free Enterprise Club’s Freedom Club PAC v. Bennett, Buckley v. Valeo, Chief Justice John Roberts, Citizens United v. FEC, Joel Gora, McCutcheon v FEC, The Roberts Court, Contribution Limits, Expenditure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Issue Advocacy, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Contributions & Limits, Expenditure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Issue Advocacy, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns

Outsourcing Politics: The Hostile Takeovers of Our Hollowed out Political Parties

In this article by New York University School of Law Professor Samuel Issacharoff, the author examines the effect of multiple factors, including strict campaign finance regulations, on the health of our nation’s political parties. As Issacharoff explains, in 2016, both the Republicans and Democrats experienced efforts at hostile takeover of their presidential campaigns. On the […]

Filed Under: Contributions & Limits, Coordination, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Political Parties, Research, Democratic Party, Republican Party, Ronald Coase, Samuel Issacharoff, V.O. Key, Contributions & Limits, Coordination, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Political Parties

Do State Campaign Finance Reforms Increase Trust and Confidence in State Government?

In this study, CCP Academic Advisor Jeff Milyo, a Professor of Economics of the University of Missouri, tests the hypothesis that restrictive campaign finance laws improve citizens’ perceptions of government. As Milyo explains, the political and legal battle over campaign finance reform hinges on differing views about the importance of such regulations for preserving and […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contributions & Limits, Enforcement, External Relations Sub-Pages, Faulty Assumptions, Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, clean elections, public financing, Contribution Limits, Enforcement, Faulty Assumptions, Contributions & Limits, Enforcement, Faulty Assumptions, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns

The State of State Parties – and How Strengthening them Can Improve our Politics

In this Brookings Institution report by Raymond J. La Raja and Jonathan Rauch, the authors examine the campaign finance rules and regulations ensnaring state parties and assess how they are increasingly costly in an age when burgeoning independent groups face no such restrictions. According to the authors, historically, and still today, state parties act as […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, Coordination, Political Parties, Research, Contribution Limits, Coordination, Contributions & Limits, Coordination, Political Parties

The Regulation of Political Finance and Corruption

In this article, authors Avi Ben-Bassat and Momi Dahan use the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (IDEA) database on political finance regulations for 82 countries to examine the effect campaign contribution limits have on political corruption. Upon analyzing the data, after controlling for a standard list of explanatory variables, the authors found that […]

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Political Climate Change: How Contribution Limits and Campaign Finance Regulations are Lengthening Campaigns for President

Why are campaigns so long these days? Why are so many candidates declaring their candidacies or announcing that they will “test the waters” for a potential presidential campaign in April 2015? It often feels like the campaign season starts earlier each cycle, but does it really? The Institute for Free Speech looked at the major […]

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Increased Campaign Contribution Limits in the FY2015 Omnibus Appropriations Law: Frequently Asked Questions

This Congressional Research Service report, authored by R. Sam Garrett, provides brief answers to frequently asked questions about increased contribution limits on giving to national political party committees enacted and signed into law in December 2014 via the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act of 2015. The relevant language changes the amounts the two major […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Federal, Contributions & Limits, Political Parties, FY 2015 CROmnibus, Research, Contributions & Limits, Political Parties

Contribution Limits Increase in 15 States and Federally after Citizens United

As this Issue Brief explains, five years after the 2010 Supreme Court decision in Citizens United v. FEC, which struck down a federal law on First Amendment grounds banning corporations and labor unions from spending money independently of campaigns to urge voters to support or oppose the candidates of their choice, and the subsequent SpeechNow.org […]

Filed Under: Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Federal, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, Handouts (Contribution Limits), Research, Super PACs, Contribution Limits, Contributions & Limits, Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Vermont, Wyoming

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.