Disclosure

Citizens United v. FEC: Facts and Falsehoods

“If the First Amendment has any force, it prohibits Congress from fining or jailing citizens, or associations of citizens, for simply engaging in political speech.” – Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 558 U.S. 310, 349 (2010) The U.S. Supreme Court’s 2010 ruling in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission struck down a provision of […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Issues, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, Disclosure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Disclosure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation

Super PACs: Expanding Freedom of Speech

“[T]he government can have no anti-corruption interest in limiting contributions to independent expenditure–only organizations.” – SpeechNow.org v. Federal Election Commission[1] The product of a 2010 court ruling, “super PACs” have been a boon to citizens wishing to more effectively speak about elections. Legally, they have ensured that Americans do not lose their First Amendment rights […]

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, Independent Speech, Issues, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Super PACs, SpeechNow.org v. FEC, The Media, Disclosure, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Disclosure, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation

Risky Business? Corporate Political Spending, Shareholder Approval, and Stock Volatility

In this updated study by Associate Professor of Political Science and Business Administration at the University of Rochester, David Primo, and Saumya Prabhat, former Assistant Professor of Finance at the Indian School of Business and current Quantitative Analytics Supervisor at Freddie Mac, the authors utilize a quasi-natural experiment to examine whether disclosure and shareholder approval […]

Filed Under: Corporate Governance, Corporate Governance Research, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, External Relations Sub-Pages, Faulty Assumptions, Research, Activist Investing, and Referendums Act of 2000, Center for Competitive Politics, corporate disclosure, David Primo, Elections, First Amendment, Fortune 500 Companies, lobbying, money in politics, NCR, Neill Committee Report, Political Parties, PPERA, Saumya Prabhat, Shareholder Approval, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions

A World Without Buckley v. Valeo

“The concept that government may restrict the speech of some elements of our society in order to enhance the relative voice of others is wholly foreign to the First Amendment.” – Buckley v. Valeo, 424 U.S. 1, 48 (1976) Decided over forty years ago, the landmark 1976 Supreme Court decision, Buckley v. Valeo, remains at […]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, Expenditure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Issues, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Money in Politics, Research, buckley, Buckley v. Valeo, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Expenditure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation

A Landmark Decision Turns Forty: A Conversation on Buckley v. Valeo

In this series of essays by Brooklyn Law School President and Joseph Crea Dean Nicholas W. Allard, U.S. Court of Appeals Senior Judge and former U.S. Senator James L. Buckley, and former ACLU Executive Director Ira Glasser, the authors discuss the landmark Buckley v. Valeo Supreme Court decision after its 40th anniversary. Written as part […]

Filed Under: Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Expenditure, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, ACLU, Buckley v. Valeo, corporate speech, corruption, eugene mccarthy, FECA, Ira Glasser, James L. Buckley, Nicholas W. Allard, Contribution Limits, Disclosure, Expenditure, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Expenditure, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation

Seven Myths about Disclosure Masquerading as “Realities”

This Issue Brief by Center for Competitive Politics Senior Fellow Eric Wang[1] analyzes seven alleged “myths” about campaign finance disclosure as discussed by the pro-regulation Campaign Legal Center. The Campaign Legal Center (CLC) recently issued a briefing paper worthy of Lewis Carroll.[2] Purporting to explain “Seven Myths (and Realities) about Disclosure,”[3] the CLC paper instead […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Corporate Governance, Corporate Governance Handouts, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, Super PACs, Super PACs, Campaign Legal Center, Electioneering Communications, federal election commission, NAACP v. Alabama, Securities and Exchange Commission, Disclosure, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Disclosure, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Super PACs

Compulsory Donor Disclosure: When Government Monitors Its Citizens

In this Heritage Foundation Legal Memorandum by CCP Chairman Bradley A. Smith, Research Fellow Scott Blackburn, and Policy Analyst Luke Wachob, the authors explain how political speech in America is subject to an ever expanding disclosure regime as more and more private information – including citizens’ names, home addresses, employers, and occupations, as well as […]

Filed Under: Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Disclosure, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, Featured Content, First Amendment, Independent Speech, IRS and the Tea Party, Research, Dark Money, Heritage Foundation, Private Giving, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, First Amendment, Independent Speech, California, Montana, New York, Wisconsin

The Victims of “Dark Money” Disclosure: How Government Reporting Requirements Suppress Speech and Limit Charitable Giving

In this Goldwater Institute Policy Report, author Jon Riches highlights the coordinated attack on private political speech under the banner of “dark money” and its dangerous effect on nonprofit organizations. As the report explains, anonymous political speech has been essential to democratic discourse since the founding of our republic. Indeed, ratification of the U.S. Constitution […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, First Amendment, Issue Advocacy, 501(c)(3)s, Dark Money, Goldwater Institute, Research (Disclosure), Disclosure, First Amendment, Issue Advocacy, Disclosure, First Amendment, Issue Advocacy, Arizona, California, Minnesota, Nevada, New York, Wisconsin

Five Misconceptions about “Dark Money”

“Dark money” is a pejorative term for spending on ads urging the election or defeat of candidates by nonprofit groups – typically 501(c)(4) social welfare organizations, 501(c)(5) labor unions, and 501(c)(6) trade associations – that do not report the names and addresses of their individual donors to the government, unless donations are earmarked to fund […]

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Three Primary Threats to 501(c)(3) Donor Privacy

Across the country, those who wish to silence dissent are seeking to force nonprofit groups to reveal the private information – names, home addresses, occupations, and employers – of their supporters to the government. This strategy, which is being employed in states across the ideological spectrum, and by officials of both parties, is intended to […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, Disclosure State, Research, "Incidental Committees", 501(c)(3)s, Electioneering Communications, Disclosure, Disclosure, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Kentucky, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Mexico, New York, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Washington

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.