Faulty Assumptions

Risky Business? Corporate Political Spending, Shareholder Approval, and Stock Volatility

In this updated study by Associate Professor of Political Science and Business Administration at the University of Rochester, David Primo, and Saumya Prabhat, former Assistant Professor of Finance at the Indian School of Business and current Quantitative Analytics Supervisor at Freddie Mac, the authors utilize a quasi-natural experiment to examine whether disclosure and shareholder approval […]

Filed Under: Corporate Governance, Corporate Governance Research, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, External Relations Sub-Pages, Faulty Assumptions, Research, Activist Investing, and Referendums Act of 2000, Center for Competitive Politics, corporate disclosure, David Primo, Elections, First Amendment, Fortune 500 Companies, lobbying, money in politics, NCR, Neill Committee Report, Political Parties, PPERA, Saumya Prabhat, Shareholder Approval, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions

Self-Styled Campaign Finance “Reformers” Jump the Shark

Self-Styled Campaign Finance “Reformers” Jump the Shark Ten Stunts, Antics, and Exploits That Show Many Anti-Free Speech Activists Have Lost It By Luke Wachob Introduction What do activists do when the government isn’t prioritizing their cause? What does the head of a federal agency do when she doesn’t get her way? What do “good government” […]

Filed Under: Amending Press Release/In the News/Blog, Amending the Constitution, Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Enforcement, Faulty Assumptions, FEC, First Amendment, Issues, Money in Politics, Research, Super PACs, Super PACs, "John Doe", Ann Ravel, Democracy Spring, Doug Hughes, ellen weintraub, federal election commission, Gyrocopter, Larry Lessig, Mayday PAC, Udall Amendment, Zephyr Teachout, Enforcement, Faulty Assumptions, First Amendment, Enforcement, Faulty Assumptions, First Amendment, Super PACs, Wisconsin

When do the Rich Win?

There is exploding academic and non-academic interest in the relative influence of economic “haves” and “have-nots” on public policy. In a recent, widely referenced 2014 article, Martin Gilens and Benjamin Page compare the influence of upper and middle-income citizens and find that the preferences of the former are all that matter for policy representation. In […]

Filed Under: Faulty Assumptions, Research, Benjamin Page, Inequality in Policy Representation, J. Alexander Branham, Martin Gilens, Faulty Assumptions, Faulty Assumptions

Do State Campaign Finance Reforms Increase Trust and Confidence in State Government?

In this study, CCP Academic Advisor Jeff Milyo, a Professor of Economics of the University of Missouri, tests the hypothesis that restrictive campaign finance laws improve citizens’ perceptions of government. As Milyo explains, the political and legal battle over campaign finance reform hinges on differing views about the importance of such regulations for preserving and […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contributions & Limits, Enforcement, External Relations Sub-Pages, Faulty Assumptions, Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, clean elections, public financing, Contribution Limits, Enforcement, Faulty Assumptions, Contributions & Limits, Enforcement, Faulty Assumptions, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns

Compulsory Donor Disclosure: When Government Monitors Its Citizens

In this Heritage Foundation Legal Memorandum by CCP Chairman Bradley A. Smith, Research Fellow Scott Blackburn, and Policy Analyst Luke Wachob, the authors explain how political speech in America is subject to an ever expanding disclosure regime as more and more private information – including citizens’ names, home addresses, employers, and occupations, as well as […]

Filed Under: Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Disclosure, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, Featured Content, First Amendment, Independent Speech, IRS and the Tea Party, Research, Dark Money, Heritage Foundation, Private Giving, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, First Amendment, Independent Speech, California, Montana, New York, Wisconsin

Testing Inferences about American Politics: A Review of the “Oligarchy” Result

In a well-publicized 2014 study, Martin Gilens and Benjamin Page argue that economic elites and business interest groups exert strong influence on U.S. government policy while average citizens have virtually no influence at all. Their conclusions are drawn from a model which is said to reveal the causal impact of each group’s preferences. In this […]

Filed Under: Faulty Assumptions, Research, Benjamin Page, Inequality of Representation, Martin Gilens, Omar S. Bashir, Faulty Assumptions, Faulty Assumptions

Campaign Spending and Electoral Competition: Towards More Policy Relevant Research

Despite long-standing scholarly literature on the electoral effects of campaign spending, academic research provides little practical policy guidance. In part, this is because existing studies have focused narrowly on some vexing statistical issues, while ignoring many others. However, this is also because political scientists have not devoted enough effort to conducting evaluation studies of how […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contributions & Limits, Expenditure, External Relations Sub-Pages, Faulty Assumptions, First Amendment, Political Parties, Research, campaign finance, campaign finance reform, campaign spending, First Amendment, Jeff Milyo, money in politics, political science research, Contribution Limits, Expenditure, Faulty Assumptions, First Amendment, Political Committees & 527s, Contributions & Limits, Expenditure, Faulty Assumptions, First Amendment, Political Committees & 527s

Do State Ethics Commissions Reduce Political Corruption? An Exploratory Investigation

In this UC Irvine Law Review article by Kayla Crider and Jeffrey Milyo, a Professor of Social Science in the Department of Economics at the University of Missouri and Academic Advisor at the Center for Competitive Politics, the authors examine the efficacy of state ethics commissions in reducing public corruption. As Crider and Milyo note, […]

Filed Under: Enforcement, Faulty Assumptions, Research, Jeffrey Milyo, Kayla Crider, Public Corruption, State Ethics Commissions, Enforcement, Faulty Assumptions, Enforcement, Faulty Assumptions

UPDATED: Issue Analysis No. 5: Do Lower Contribution Limits Decrease Public Corruption?

Note: This report is an updated version of an Issue Analysis originally published by the Center for Competitive Politics in January 2009. This version has been edited to reflect contribution limits from the 2011-2012 election cycle and corruption data, from 2001-2010. Advocates of campaign finance regulation often claim that contributions to political candidates must be limited […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, Faulty Assumptions, Research, State, Campaign Contribution Limits, Center for Competitive Politics, corruption, Issue Analysis 5, Luke Wachob, Matt Nese, money in politics, the 50 states, U.S. Census Bureau, Contribution Limits, Faulty Assumptions, Contributions & Limits, Faulty Assumptions, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District Of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Campaigns, Mobilization, and Turnout in Mayoral Elections

In this paper, authors Thomas M. Holbrook and Aaron C. Weinschenk assess methods of increasing voter turnout by examining mayoral elections across the United States. Generally, research on local turnout has focused on institutions, with little attention devoted to examining the impact of campaigns. Using an original data set containing information from 144 large U.S. […]

Filed Under: Contributions & Limits, Expenditure, Faulty Assumptions, Research, Competition, Mayoral Elections, Voter Turnout, Contribution Limits, Expenditure, Faulty Assumptions, Contributions & Limits, Expenditure, Faulty Assumptions

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.