The Story of Stupid Campaign Finance Laws: A Tale of Sanders’ Donors

On February 11, the Federal Election Commission (FEC) sent a “preliminary review” to Bernie Sanders’ campaign detailing the many ways the campaign had failed to properly dot its’ i’s and cross its’ t’s. Such letters are routine in political campaigns; it is essentially impossible to follow the FEC’s reporting requirements to the letter of the […]

Filed Under: Blog, 2016 Campaign, Campaign Contribution Limits, campaign contributions, FEC, regulation, Senator Bernie Sanders

The Curious Case of Contribution Limits in an Era of Independent Expenditures

Minnesota was one of eight states to raise contribution limits in 2013, but according to some, the Gopher State hasn’t gone far enough to resolve concerns surrounding its campaign finance system. The AP reports: Minnesota campaign finance regulators are wrestling with how to maintain proper separation between candidates and political groups independently spending money on […]

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure, Disclosure Press Release/In the News/Blog, campaign contributions, campaign finance, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Contribution limits, coordination, First Amendment, independent speech, independent spending, Luke Wachob, Minnesota, Minnesota Campaign Finance Board, money in politics, super PACs, Minnesota

Political Participation and Civic Courage: The Negative Effect of Transparency on Making Small Campaign Contributions

This study by Raymond J. La Raja examines whether public disclosure of campaign contributions affects individuals’ willingness to donate to candidates. Across the country, state campaign finance laws require disclosure of contributors’ private information at relatively low thresholds, ranging from $1 in seven states to $300 in New Jersey. Drawing on social influence theory, La […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure State, External Relations Sub-Pages, Research, 50 States, Amherst, campaign contributions, Civic Participation, Disclosure, Political Giving, Raymond J. La Raja, Small Donors, Social Influence Theory, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Disclosure, Disclosure, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District Of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Richer Parties, Better Politics? Party-Centered Campaign Finance Laws and American Democracy

Campaign finance laws effect how money is channeled through organizations to influence elections. In contrast to most other democracies, American campaign finance laws have been designed to be “candidate-centered” with relatively weak political parties. Additionally, recent trends have seen independent forms of speech such as political action committees (PACs) and Super PACs become much more […]

Filed Under: Contributions & Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties, Research, campaign contributions, campaign finance, campaign finance reform, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, money in politics, Political Parties, Raymond La Raja, super PACs, Contribution Limits, Independent Speech, Political Committees & 527s, Contributions & Limits, Independent Speech, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties

Free Speech, Fair Elections, and Campaign Finance Laws: Can They Co-Exist?

A prominent politician once observed that, “You can either have free speech or fair elections, but you can’t have both.” In this article, CCP Academic Advisor and Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School Joel M. Gora argues that saying has it all backwards. In fact, you cannot have one without the other. The election of 2012 […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contributions & Limits, Expenditure, Faulty Assumptions, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Money in Politics, Research, Super PACs, Super PACs, campaign contributions, campaign finance, Contribution limits, First Amendment, free speech, money in politics, super PACs, Contribution Limits, Faulty Assumptions, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Contributions & Limits, Faulty Assumptions, First Amendment, Independent Speech

Amicus Brief: Danielczyk v. United States Supreme Court Amicus

Download Amicus Brief

Filed Under: Completed Amicus Briefs, Legal, Legal Center, United States v. Danielczyk, Allen Dickerson, amicus brief, campaign contributions, Contribution limits, corporate contributions, corporations, Danielczyk, All CCP Legal Documents, Amicus Briefs, Completed Cases (Amicus), United States v. Danielczyk, Amicus Briefs, Completed Cases (Amicus)

Media Watch: Good News for Campaign Finance

The NY Time’s David Firestone published a post on the Time’s Editorial Page Editor’s blog last week decrying the post-election spending results.  Titled “Bad News for Campaign Finance,” the post was in many ways a sign of how the First Amendment protections have been prevailing over ridiculous political speech restrictions and citizens have been more involved than […]

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure, Disclosure Press Release/In the News/Blog, Media Watch, Super PACs, campaign contributions, campaign finance, campaign finance reform, clean elections, Contribution limits, corporate contributions, DISCLOSE, Disclosure, First Amendment, free speech, koch brothers, media watch, New York, New York Times, non-profits, Obama, District Of Columbia, New York

DC Circuit Denies Stay in Van Hollen Decision

From Rick Hasen’s Election Law Blog: Big news from the D.C. Circuit…The opinion for two of the three judges explaining the reasons for denying the stay lean heavily on how the challengers to the district court ruling are unlikely to succeed in their legal arguments on appeal. The court also stresses the values of disclosure, […]

Filed Under: In the News, Newsroom, campaign contributions, Disclosure, non-profits, Van Hollen, District Of Columbia

Keep Out: How State Campaign Finance Laws Erect Barriers to Entry for Political Entrepreneurs

In this report, the author explains how forms of state legislation stifle the political speech of political entrepreneurs, those individuals and organizations who form and grow new political voices and movements. Specifically, the report examines the effects of two types of state campaign finance regulations that act as barriers to independent citizen groups:  contribution limits and political action committee (PAC) requirements. A lack of appreciation for the role of political entrepreneurs in promoting innovative public policy and electoral competition on the part of those in power has resulted in the erection of barriers for outside groups who wish to speak out. The report concludes that instead of encouraging civic engagement, states are attacking independent political advocacy through unnecessary, speech-limiting regulations.

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Issue Advocacy, Research, Super PACs, campaign contributions, Contribution, Contribution Limits, Disclosure, Expenditure, Political Committees & 527s, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Expenditure, Political Committees & 527s, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Testimony of CCP Research & Government Relations Director Laura Renz to the Maryland Joint Committee On Administrative, Executive, & Legislative Review

Written testimony of CCP Research & Government Relations Director Laura Renz to July 20, 2010 hearing before the Maryland Joint Committee On Administrative, Executive, & Legislative Review on the topic of campaign finance legislation and electronic media.

Filed Under: Blog, External Relations Comments and Testimony, External Relations Sub-Pages, State, State Comments and Testimony, campaign contributions, Contribution, Comments and Testimony, Maryland

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.