Learn Liberty Presents: “Money in Politics”

IHS’  Learn Liberty video series released a video featuring Brad Smith yesterday entitled “Money in Politics.” Should we worry when money and politics mix? Common wisdom suggests that large campaign contributions can corrupt politicians and disenfranchise regular voters. However, Prof. Brad Smith argues that the real result of campaign finance regulation has been to turn […]

Filed Under: Blog, Money in Politics, Brad Smith, campaign finance, campaign finance reform, Center for Competitive Politics, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Contribution, corporate contributions, First Amendment, free speech, money in politics

Daily Media Links 7/26: Groups ask FEC to blur lines between candidates, super PACs and nonprofits, Bundlers Give to Both Parties, and more…

Independent groups Politico: Dawn of the Mommy and Daddy PACs  By KENNETH P. VOGEL Talk about helicopter parents: Candidates’ rich mothers, fathers, brothers and sisters increasingly are pouring cash into super PACs that support their loved ones’ campaigns — a phenomenon that critics say tests the bounds of both contribution limits and rules barring coordination between […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links, campaign ads, campaign finance, campaign finance reform, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Contribution limits, coordination, corporate contributions, DISCLOSE

Daily Media Links 6/22: Are corporate campaign contributions good or bad for shareholders, Stirring the constitutional pot, and more…

CCP Are corporate campaign contributions good or bad for shareholders? By Jason Farrell The argument that corporate spending on political campaigns is making companies rich has been screamed ad infinitum by the media and pro-regulation groups like Common Cause. Read more… Independent groups Washington Post: Stirring the constitutional pot  By Ruth Marcus In the age of […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links, campaign finance, campaign finance reform, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Contribution limits, DISCLOSE, End of Democracy, First Amendment, free speech, money in politics, non-profits

Money, Politics and Democracy at Stake and How Government Stifles Grassroots Political Advocacy

The American Constitution Society held a conference Friday on money in politics.  The panel, “Citizens United Two Years Later: Money, Politics and Democracy at Stake,” featured CCP Chairman Brad Smith, and discussed Citizens United, disclosure, and public financing. Jonathan Adler from the Volokh Conspiracy attended and reported on the panel: Professor Bradley Smith of Capital University, former chair of the […]

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure, Disclosure Press Release/In the News/Blog, Money in Politics, Brad Smith, campaign finance, campaign finance reform, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Contribution, Contribution limits, DISCLOSE, Disclose Act, Disclosure, FEC, First Amendment, John Edwards, money in politics, super PAC

Campaign finance disclosure, Spiderman, and Emily Litella

As a general rule, should citizens be required to report their political activity to the government? There are good arguments for it – John Stuart Mill thought all voting should be public – but there are also good arguments against it (invasion of privacy, threats of official or private retaliation). The key is to strike […]

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure, Disclosure Press Release/In the News/Blog, 60 plus association, american future fund, americans for job security, americans for prosperity, campaign finance disclosure, campaign finance reform, Chamber of Commerce, citizens for sound economy, courtney kosher, CPPR, emily litella, eric novack, heather higgins, independent women's forum, john stuart mill, koch brothers, peter parker, Richard Hasen, richard hasten, sean noble, spiderman, susan b. anthony list, District Of Columbia

The Changing Rhetoric of Campaign Finance — Illinois Democrats Offer Innovative Campaign Freedom Measure

Illinois Democrats have an interesting proposal to “level the playing field” with independent expenditure committees.  A Federal Court recently applied the SpeechNow.org logic to allow independent expenditure committees to speak out in Illinois statewide and legislative campaigns.  This has caused a reaction in the Illinois General Assembly. From the Chicago Tribune: House Majority Leader Barbara […]

Filed Under: Blog, Featured Content, Super PACs, campaign finance reform, Chicago, Contribution limits, Illinois

Full Disclosure: How Campaign Finance Disclosure Laws Fail to Inform Voters and Stifle Public Debate

Disclosure is intended to be a low-cost means of combating corruption by providing citizens with information about the funding sources and expenditures of groups that advocate for or against issues on the ballot. In practice, however, disclosure does little to inform voters while imposing onerous burdens on those wishing to participate in the democratic debate. […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure State, External Relations Sub-Pages, Research, campaign finance reform, David Primo, Disclosure, Florida, institute for justice, Disclosure, Disclosure, Florida

Disclosures about Disclosure

In this article, Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer takes an interesting look at the Supreme Court decision in Citizens United v. FEC. He notes that while the Court lifted a longstanding ban on corporations and unions, who wish to engage in election related spending, the Court left questions pertaining to disclosure and disclaimer provisions related to independent expenditures unanswered. Mayer attempts to discover whether or not existing disclosure and disclaimer rules result in better informed voters and addresses the extent to which existing current requirements result in potential retaliation from political opponents. As the virtues of disclosure and disclaimers are too often unquestioned, he suggests that further research should be done in order to determine whether or not current policies are accomplishing their stated objectives. Given the recent reaffirmation of fundamental speech rights in Citizens United, Mayer advocates that disclosure and disclaimer rules should be designed to encourage greater political participation and assist voters in making better ballot-box initiatives.

Filed Under: Research, campaign finance, campaign finance reform, Center for Competitive Politics, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission

Mandatory Disclosure for Ballot-Initiative Campaigns

The most common approach to disclosure in American politics is simply and aptly described as “more is better.” Disclosure is often championed as a low-cost means of combating the allegedly corrosive effects of money in politics by providing information to the public about the source of funding and expenditures made by groups advocating for the […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure State, External Relations Sub-Pages, Research, ballot initiatives, campaign finance reform, Dick Carpenter, Disclosure, institute for justice, polling, Disclosure, Disclosure, California, Colorado, Florida, Massachusetts, Ohio, Washington

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.