Risky Business? Corporate Political Spending, Shareholder Approval, and Stock Volatility

In this updated study by Associate Professor of Political Science and Business Administration at the University of Rochester, David Primo, and Saumya Prabhat, former Assistant Professor of Finance at the Indian School of Business and current Quantitative Analytics Supervisor at Freddie Mac, the authors utilize a quasi-natural experiment to examine whether disclosure and shareholder approval […]

Filed Under: Corporate Governance, Corporate Governance Research, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, External Relations Sub-Pages, Faulty Assumptions, Research, Activist Investing, and Referendums Act of 2000, Center for Competitive Politics, corporate disclosure, David Primo, Elections, First Amendment, Fortune 500 Companies, lobbying, money in politics, NCR, Neill Committee Report, Political Parties, PPERA, Saumya Prabhat, Shareholder Approval, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions

Mayday! Mayday! Responding to Professor Lessig’s defense of Mayday PAC’s lawbreaking

Larry Lessig this week produced a second, more thorough, response to our complaint filed with the FEC against his Mayday PAC. Prof. Lessig’s latest response can, I believe, be accurately summarized into three points: one, disclaimer laws are not too complicated, they are actually straightforward, but vendors employed by Mayday PAC failed to correctly adopt […]

Filed Under: Blog, Brad Smith, Center for Competitive Politics, disclaimers, FEC, Lessig, Mayday

Does Larry Lessig Think He and Mayday PAC are Above the Law?

Does Larry Lessig think he and his supporters are above the law? In response to a complaint that CCP filed with the FEC, documenting 12 instances in which Lessig’s Mayday PAC violated campaign disclosure rules, Professor Lessig offers this feeble defense: Every Mayday.US ad fully identified Mayday.US as its sponsor. And unlike superPACs that accept dark […]

Filed Under: Blog, CCP, Center for Competitive Politics, David keating, Disclosure, Embrace the Irony, FEC, Larry Lessig, Mayday PAC, Mayday.US, Professor Lessig

Policy Primer: Campaign Contribution Limits – A Cap on Free Speech

Although the Supreme Court has upheld some forms of contribution limits, such laws diminish the First Amendment’s guarantee that Congress and the States “shall make no law… abridging the freedom of speech….” While many perceive limits to be widespread, many states actually do not limit various forms of contributions to candidates, political parties, or political […]

Filed Under: 1. McCutcheon, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Federal, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Research, Center for Competitive Politics, Contribution Caps, Donation Limits, Randall v. Sorrell, Contribution Limits, Handouts (Contribution Limits), Research, Contribution Limits, Contributions & Limits, Vermont

State False Statement Laws: Should the Government Act as the Truth Police?

State False Statement Laws: Should the Government Act as the Truth Police? By Matt Nese and Brennan Mancil This Issue Review discusses the seventeen states that have adopted constitutionally vulnerable “false statement” laws that unwisely put government in the business of acting as the “truth police.” Such statutes cover general speech about a candidate or […]

Filed Under: First Amendment, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, SBA List v. Driehaus, Brennan Mancil, Center for Competitive Politics, False Statement Laws, Matt Nese, Ohio Elections Commission, First Amendment, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Alaska, Colorado, Florida, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin

Policy Primer: Taxpayer-Financed Campaigns – A Costly and Failed Policy

Often euphemistically referred to as “clean elections” or public financing, taxpayer-financed campaign programs seek to replace private, voluntary contributions from citizens to their favored candidates with government grants of taxpayer dollars to candidates who meet certain requirements. Commonly promoted as a cure-all for improving government and reducing corruption, an evaluation of Arizona, Connecticut, and Maine’s […]

Filed Under: External Relations Sub-Pages, Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Handouts, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax Financed Campaigns State, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Center for Competitive Politics, clean elections, corruption, Fraud, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Arizona, Connecticut, Maine, New York

Unenforceable: States Respond to McCutcheon and Support the First Amendment

Unenforceable:  States Respond to McCutcheon and Support the First Amendment By Matt Nese On April 2, 2014, the Supreme Court issued its decision in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission, which invalidated the federal aggregate limit on contributions by individuals to candidate campaigns and political committees as unconstitutional under the First Amendment.[1] This brief examines the […]

Filed Under: 1. McCutcheon, Arguments, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Handouts (Contribution Limits), Research, aggregate limits, Center for Competitive Politics, District of Columbia, Matt Nese, McCutcheon v FEC, Proportional Bans, Proportional Limits, Shaun McCutcheon, Contribution Limits, Contributions & Limits, Alaska, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New York, South Carolina, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Issue Analysis No. 9: Aggregate and Proportional Limits in the States: Have they Reduced Corruption or Promoted Better Government?

The Center’s ninth Issue Analysis examines the potential impact of the Supreme Court’s McCutcheon decision on the states with existing aggregate limit provisions, particularly as it relates to the effect of those provisions on both public corruption rates and how well a state is governed. For background, on April 2, 2014, the Supreme Court issued […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, State, aggregate limits, Center for Competitive Politics, Contribution limits, First Amendment, Good Governance, Matt Nese, McCutcheon v FEC, money in politics, Pew Center on the States, Public Corruption, Shaun McCutcheon, Supreme Court, Contribution Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Contributions & Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Alaska, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New York, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Wyoming

State Aggregate Limits and Proportional Bans under McCutcheon

State Aggregate Limits and Proportional Bans under McCutcheon Likely Unconstitutional or Highly Vulnerable By Matt Nese Please note:  This report has been updated to reflect state responses to the Supreme Court’s McCutcheon decision. On April 2, 2014, the Supreme Court issued its decision in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission, which invalidated the federal aggregate limit […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Federal, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Political Parties, Research, State, State Press Releases and Blogs, aggregate limits, Base Contribution Limits, Center for Competitive Politics, District of Columbia, First Amendment, Matt Nese, McCutcheon v FEC, Quid Pro Quo, Shaun McCutcheon, Contribution Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Contributions & Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Political Parties, Alaska, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New York, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Legislative Review: 2013 State Legislative Trends – Campaign Contribution Limits Increase in Nine States

As this Legislative Review explains, a Center for Competitive Politics’ survey of 2013 state legislative activity shows that nine states – Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Wyoming – raised or eliminated various campaign contribution limits last year. Five states increased their limits by 100% or more, two more increased their […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties, Research, 50 State Survey, Alabama, Arizona, Campaign Contribution Limits, Center for Competitive Politics, Connecticut, Corporate to Candidate Contributions, First Amendment, Florida, Illinois, Incumbency Protection, Independent Expenditures, independent spending, Individual to Candidate Contributions, Luke Wachob, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, PACs, Political Parties, State Legislative Activity, super PACs, Tennessee, Vermont, Wyoming, Contribution Limits, Political Committees & 527s, Contributions & Limits, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties, Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Vermont, Wyoming

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.