Risky Business? Corporate Political Spending, Shareholder Approval, and Stock Volatility

In this updated study by Associate Professor of Political Science and Business Administration at the University of Rochester, David Primo, and Saumya Prabhat, former Assistant Professor of Finance at the Indian School of Business and current Quantitative Analytics Supervisor at Freddie Mac, the authors utilize a quasi-natural experiment to examine whether disclosure and shareholder approval […]

Filed Under: Corporate Governance, Corporate Governance Research, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, External Relations Sub-Pages, Faulty Assumptions, Research, Activist Investing, and Referendums Act of 2000, Center for Competitive Politics, corporate disclosure, David Primo, Elections, First Amendment, Fortune 500 Companies, lobbying, money in politics, NCR, Neill Committee Report, Political Parties, PPERA, Saumya Prabhat, Shareholder Approval, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions

Cato Holds Discussion on New Floyd Abrams Book on First Amendment

On Monday, the Cato Institute hosted a forum to discuss Floyd Abrams’s new book, The Soul of the First Amendment. Abrams is well known as a scholar and litigator of free speech issues. He is Senior Counsel at Cahill Gordon & Reindel LLP and has been involved in numerous Supreme Court cases, including the famous […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Issues, Cato Institute, First Amendment, Floyd Abrams, free speech, Ilya Shapiro, Roger Pilon, Ronald Collins, The Soul of the First Amendment

An Amendment to Restrict Political Speech Rights

At a recent town hall meeting in his district, Representative Ted Deutch (D-FL) renewed his perennial call to amend the Constitution to give incumbent politicians unprecedented power to regulate any money raised or spent “to influence elections.” Of course, money spent for the purpose of influencing elections is primarily money spent on speech. And presumably, […]

Filed Under: Amending Press Release/In the News/Blog, Amending the Constitution, Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Issues, First Amendment, independent speech, Ted Deutch, Tom Udall, U.S. Constitution, Udall Amendment, Florida, New Mexico

Senator Klobuchar on Campaign Finance: An Admission Against Interest?

As most any law student can tell you, “strict scrutiny” is the toughest standard of judicial review in federal court. Normally, it applies whenever the government seeks to place limits on the exercise of a “fundamental right.” To survive “strict scrutiny,” a law must address a “compelling” government interest, and be “narrowly tailored” to address […]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Press Release/In the News/Blog, Amy Klobuchar, Federal Election Campaign Act, First Amendment, Gorsuch, Hobby Lobby, Neil Gorsuch, Riddle v. Hickenlooper, strict scrutiny, Supreme Court, Colorado

Speech These Days: It’s Just Too Damn Loud…

Howard Schweber, a Professor of Political Science and Legal Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, flippantly claims that the most imminent threat to our democracy is speech that is, in his opinion, too “loud.” According to a recent blog by Schweber in The Huffington Post, some speakers in our democracy, like some commenters on the […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Issues, Buckley v. Valeo, First Amendment, Howard Schweber, Internet Speech

We give Fact Checker one-half Pinocchio: Super PACs and our complex campaign finance system

Back when I was serving as Chairman of the Federal Election Commission, I met with a delegation of officials from China. Since they spoke little English, we conversed through an interpreter. They were full of questions about campaign finance in the U.S., and soon I was trying to explain our incredibly regulated, complex system. There […]

Filed Under: Amending the Constitution, Blog, Communications, Contribution Limits, Media Resources, Media Watch, Super PACs, Bernie Sanders, Charles Idelson, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Fact Checker, First Amendment, Michelle Ye Hee Lee, National Nurses United for Patient Protection, super PACs, The Washington Post Fact Checker

Issue Analysis No. 9: Aggregate and Proportional Limits in the States: Have they Reduced Corruption or Promoted Better Government?

The Center’s ninth Issue Analysis examines the potential impact of the Supreme Court’s McCutcheon decision on the states with existing aggregate limit provisions, particularly as it relates to the effect of those provisions on both public corruption rates and how well a state is governed. For background, on April 2, 2014, the Supreme Court issued […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, State, aggregate limits, Center for Competitive Politics, Contribution limits, First Amendment, Good Governance, Matt Nese, McCutcheon v FEC, money in politics, Pew Center on the States, Public Corruption, Shaun McCutcheon, Supreme Court, Contribution Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Contributions & Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Alaska, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New York, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Wyoming

State Aggregate Limits and Proportional Bans under McCutcheon

State Aggregate Limits and Proportional Bans under McCutcheon Likely Unconstitutional or Highly Vulnerable By Matt Nese Please note:  This report has been updated to reflect state responses to the Supreme Court’s McCutcheon decision. On April 2, 2014, the Supreme Court issued its decision in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission, which invalidated the federal aggregate limit […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Federal, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Political Parties, Research, State, State Press Releases and Blogs, aggregate limits, Base Contribution Limits, Center for Competitive Politics, District of Columbia, First Amendment, Matt Nese, McCutcheon v FEC, Quid Pro Quo, Shaun McCutcheon, Contribution Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Contributions & Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Political Parties, Alaska, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New York, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Legislative Review: 2013 State Legislative Trends – Campaign Contribution Limits Increase in Nine States

As this Legislative Review explains, a Center for Competitive Politics’ survey of 2013 state legislative activity shows that nine states – Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Wyoming – raised or eliminated various campaign contribution limits last year. Five states increased their limits by 100% or more, two more increased their […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties, Research, 50 State Survey, Alabama, Arizona, Campaign Contribution Limits, Center for Competitive Politics, Connecticut, Corporate to Candidate Contributions, First Amendment, Florida, Illinois, Incumbency Protection, Independent Expenditures, independent spending, Individual to Candidate Contributions, Luke Wachob, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, PACs, Political Parties, State Legislative Activity, super PACs, Tennessee, Vermont, Wyoming, Contribution Limits, Political Committees & 527s, Contributions & Limits, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties, Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Vermont, Wyoming

The Last Rites of Public Campaign Financing?

In the wake of the Supreme Court’s 5-4 decision in Arizona Free Enterprise v. Bennett, this Nebraska Law Review article by Hofstra University Law School Professor James J. Sample asserts the current predicament of public campaign financing is such that options that are still on the table under the Court’s First Amendment jurisprudence are, with […]

Filed Under: External Relations Sub-Pages, First Amendment, Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax Financed Campaigns State, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Arizona, Arizona Free Enterprise v. Bennett, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, clean elections, First Amendment, James J. Sample, NYC, public financing, Supreme Court, tax financing, taxpayer financed campaigns, taxpayer-financed campaigns, First Amendment, First Amendment, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Arizona, Connecticut, Maine

The Center for Competitive Politics is now the Institute for Free Speech.